Group Presentations

Science students are creating interactive activities to present a science topic to their classmates. This group project is due on the 26th of May.

Students can do research at home, but presentation needs to be created in class.

Parents, you can support your child by helping them find resources and understanding some of the articles they read. Also make sure that the extra resources are at grade level, as some of the topics will be studied in depth in later years.

Resources for every station:

Mass vs Weight

http://education.ssc.nasa.gov/mvw_intro_video.asp

Electric Fields

http://www.physics4kids.com/files/elec_field.html

http://kids.britannica.com/comptons/article-200050/electricity

Earth as a Magnet

http://www.physics4kids.com/files/motion_gravity.html

Newton’s Law of Gravity

https://www.brainpop.com/science/motionsforcesandtime/gravity/

Coulomb’s Law

http://www.physics4kids.com/files/elec_coulomb.html

http://kids.britannica.com/comptons/article-200050/electricity

 

 

Letter to Parents

Good Morning,

The letter below was sent to all parents earlier this week.  I wanted to post it on the blog incase anyone did not get the email.

Please email me if you have any questions.

Best,

Katie Williams

Email:

Hello,

As many of you may already know, I am expecting my third child. I will be traveling back to the United States to deliver the baby. My last working day will be Thursday May 12th. Although I am disappointed to not be able to finish the school year with this enthusiastic bunch of young scientists, I feel fortunate to have found a wonderful long term substitute teacher. Alina Nistor will be taking my place starting on May 15th. She will teach 6th grade science until the end of the year. Alina has been the long term substitute teacher for Ms. Mubarak , the 7th grade social studies teacher. Ms. Nistor is familiar with our students, our grading system and how the middle school systems operate. Next week she will be shadowing me in order to get to know the students better and to learn how our science class operates. I will be turning over all the students’ grades to Ms. Nistor and she will be writing the fourth quarter report cards. She and I have already outlined the units and discussed assessments for the rest of the year. I am confident the students are in good hands.

I have thoroughly enjoyed teaching your children. As a whole, they have a passion for science and a great sense of humour.

I wish you and your family all the best.

Have a great rest of the year and a wonderful summer holiday.

Warm regards,
Katie Williams

Materials to Help Students Study for the Upcoming Exam

Article to Review: 

Newton’s Third Law

Every action has an equal and opposite reaction.

  • State Newton’s Third Law of Motion.
  • Describe action and reaction forces.
  • Explain why action and reaction forces are not balanced forces.

 

Screen Shot 2016-05-02 at 12.36.27 PM

This is a sketch of Mohammad on his skateboard. He’s on his way to Newton’s Skate Park. When he pushes his foot against the ground, what happens next? He moves on his skateboard in the opposite direction. How does this happen?

Action and Reaction

Newton’s third law of motion explains how Mohammad starts his skateboard moving. This law states that every action has an equal and opposite reaction. This means that forces always act in pairs. First an action occurs— Mohammad pushes against the ground with his foot. Then a reaction occurs— Mohammad moves forward on his skateboard. The reaction is always equal in strength to the action but in the opposite direction.

Q: If Mohammad pushes against the ground with greater force, how will this affect his forward motion?

A: His action force will be greater, so the reaction force will be greater as well. Mohammad will be pushed forward with more force, and this will make him go faster and farther.

Equal and Opposite Forces

The forces involved in actions and reactions can be represented with arrows. The way an arrow points shows the direction of the force, and the size of the arrow represents the strength of the force. Look at the skateboarders in the Figure below. In the top row, the arrows represent the forces with which the skateboarders push against each other. This is the action. In the bottom row, the arrows represent the forces with which the skateboarders move apart. This is the reaction. Compare the top and bottom arrows. They point in different directions, but they are the same size. This shows that the reaction forces are equal and opposite to the action forces.

Screen Shot 2016-05-02 at 12.37.21 PM

Equal and Opposite but Not Balanced

Because action and reaction forces are equal and opposite, you might think they would cancel out, as balanced forces do. But you would be wrong. Balanced forces are equal and opposite forces that act on the same object. That’s why they cancel out. Action-reaction forces are equal and opposite forces that act on different objects, so they don’t cancel out. In fact, they often result in motion. Think about Mohammad again. He applies force with his foot to the ground, whereas the ground applies force to Mohammad and the skateboard, causing them to move forward.

Q: Actions and reactions occur all the time. Can you think of an example in your daily life?

A: Here’s one example. If you lean on something like a wall or your locker, you are applying force to it. The wall or locker applies an equal and opposite force to you. If it didn’t, you would go right through it or else it would tip over.

Summary

  • Newton’s third law of motion states that every action has an equal and opposite reaction. This means that forces always act in pairs.
  • Action and reaction forces are equal and opposite, but they are not balanced forces because they act on different objects so they don’t cancel out.

 

Videos to Review;

 

 

 

 

Science Exam Thursday May 12th

Parents, you can support your child by encouraging them to start study now.

 

Study Guide for Newton’s Third Law and Variables Exam

The exam will be Thursday May 12th.

The test has a total of 15 questions.  The questions have different points associated with them based on the difficulty of the question.

Below is a breakdown of the different sections and the content students can expect to see in each section.

 Section A:  Questions are worth 1 point each.

  • These questions are true/false and multiple choice.
  • MANY of these questions are taken from the article Newton’s Third Law that we read and studied in class
    • Reread the article.
    • Pay attention to the skateboard example and the diagram and explanation of equal and opposite forces.
  • Review the videos posted on the blog explaining Newton’s Third law.
    • Pay attention to the rocket example.

Section B: Questions are worth 2 points each.

  • These questions are short answer.
  • Review the notes taken in class.
  • You will be asked to define Newton’s Third Law and identify the action and reaction in a given scenario.
  • You will have to define and give examples of independent, dependent, and controlled variables as well as a controlled group.

Section C: Questions are worth 4 points each.

  • These questions require multiple part answers.
  • Make sure you have an extensive understanding of Newton’s Third Law. This means do more than just memorize the rule. You need to be able to explain it.
  • You will be asked to explain why something is NOT an example of Newton’s Third Law.

Section D: Questions are worth 5 points each.

  • You will be asked to explain why something is an example of Newton’s Third Law.
  • You need to explain the directions of the forces and the impact of mass on the force.